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Two "My Kitchen Rules" Contestants Were Covertly Filmed In A Sex Act. Channel Seven Staff Allegedly "Cheered" At The Footage.

Two contestants set to appear on the next season of My Kitchen Rules were filmed being sexually intimate without their knowledge, and the footage then allegedly shared among Channel Seven staff. In the upcoming season of the cooking show, contestants are split into two teams, one lead by chef Manu Feildel and the other by chef Colin Fassnidge. Each team lives together in a separate house. The footage, taken in mid-2019, shows a male contestant consensually digitally penetrating a female contestant on a couch in one of the houses.

This Sexual Assault Survivor Decided Not To Press Charges. Then Police Took Away Her Other Option.

Marie — a pseudonym to protect her privacy — is a cautious online dater. “I usually go through a long vetting process of talking with them online first,” the 32-year-old told BuzzFeed News. “I like to think I’m really careful with people and I don’t do one-night stands.” Marie lives in a sharehouse of single women who always share a man’s details, sometimes even licence plate numbers, with each other before going on dates. But safety measures were of no use to her when she was allegedly sexual

A Journalist, Editor, Survivor, Lawyer, And Academic Weigh In On What's Holding Back #MeToo In Australia

In the United States, allegations against Harvey Weinstein propelled a flood of investigations and the downfall of more than 200 public figures, but there has been a relative dearth of #MeToo stories published in Australia — even accounting for differences in population — where an astonishing 85% of women have experienced sexual harassment. Most high profile #MeToo stories in Australia, excluding allegations made about celebrity gardener Don Burke, have been overshadowed by legal proceedings.

The Identities Of Rape And Assault Survivors Were Accidentally Revealed In A #MeToo Documentary

Australia’s public broadcaster has been forced to apologise after it distributed to journalists a documentary about the #MeToo movement that identified survivors of rape and assault without their consent. The names, images and harrowing stories of two women were clearly visible in a preview copy of Silent No More, a three-part documentary series produced for the ABC by Southern Pictures, and presented by journalist and author Tracey Spicer.

Their Loved Ones Were Murdered By Men. Careless Journalists Compounded Their Grief.

Nikita’s partner stabbed her 35 times, an ambush as she slept, before calling the police to turn himself in in the early hours of Jan. 9, 2015. Tarang Chawla remembers there was a breaking news story “within hours” of his sister’s death. “At that stage I didn’t even believe it, I was still in shock and it was a bit of a blur,” Chawla told BuzzFeed News. “She was killed on a Friday, and people were ringing non-stop all weekend.” He didn’t know whether to answer the phone. Was it a relative call

This Feminist Group Was Meant To Lead Australia's #MeToo Movement. It's Barely Delivered Anything.

NOW was the Australian version of Time’s Up, the organisation started by Hollywood celebrities in January 2018 that has raised more than $22 million for its legal defence fund, and connected thousands of men and women to lawyers. But in its first 18 months, NOW Australia has built up no such momentum. Launched hastily and with much fanfare, the organisation has failed to live up to any of its lofty promises. In an era where tweets have launched social movements, NOW offers a cautionary tale: how a well-intentioned group lacking infrastructure and experience can collapse under the weight of its own expectations. Elsewhere, #MeToo movements have turned momentum into action and legislation – but the Australian iteration has struggled to lock in its cultural gains. Glowing media coverage of NOW promised a triage service that would direct survivors to legal support, counselling and journalists. But behind the scenes tensions were running high between Spicer and board members over what they could realistically achieve.

This Sex Worker Who Was Sexually Assaulted Didn’t Think She Would Be Believed. Now Her Client Is Going To Jail

“They’re not going to believe me because I’m a sex worker.” This is what Nikki Cox — a pseudonym she works under — thought to herself when she drove to a police station after she was sexually assaulted by a client, who booked with the name Alex, in February last year. But Alex was on Tuesday handed a partly suspended sentence of 15-months in jail — of which he must serve two months — for one count of aggravated sexual assault, to which he pleaded guilty in April.

"Racism And Sexism Come Together": Inside Australia's Far Right

Australia’s far right nationalist movement is a fractured network of rabidly racist and obsessively Islamophobic white men who use Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and message forums to connect with those who share their unrelenting disgust for multiculturalism, immigration and feminism. BuzzFeed News spoke to high profile Muslim women in Australia who have been targeted by these groups, including the nation’s first ever Muslim senator Mehreen Faruqi, who says these men spread an “absolutely inter-related” mix of misogyny and racism.

A Postal Abortion Service That Sent RU486 To Thousands Of Women Is Shutting Down

The Tabbot Foundation was founded in Sept. 2015 by Dr Paul Hyland, who said his service had provided medical terminations to around 6,000 Australian women living "as far east as Lord Howe Island and as far west as Rottnest Island". "After we finish the last 20 patients that we have registered it is over, with great regret and remorse," the 75-year-old gynaecologist told BuzzFeed News. "For the first time in my life I won't have to be on-call 24 hours a day."

White Ribbon Australia Has Withdrawn Its Support For Reproductive Rights

BuzzFeed News broke the story that White Ribbon had withdrawn a statement that said “all women should have complete control over their reproductive and sexual health”. The retracted statement was first issued in February 2017 during a previous push to decriminalise abortion in Queensland and highlights that research indicates unplanned pregnancy is more common among women experiencing domestic violence. White Ribbon Australia did not announce the initial retraction, but BuzzFeed News understands members of the organisation contacted a number of pregnancy option counselling and sexual health providers to notify them of the shift on Thursday, the morning after politicians voted to decriminalise abortion in Queensland. The anti-domestic violence charity’s (then) new chief executive Tracy McLeod Howe told BuzzFeed News the organisation had withdrawn the statement because "we are agnostic until our stakeholders tell us it is important to most of them". The story was then covered by Fairfax, ABC, Women's Agenda, Guardian, News Corp and Ten Daily. There was a big public backlash, McLeod Howe issued a mea culpa, the organisation then reissued the statement and McLeod Howe ultimately left the organisation claiming she was "pushed out".

This Video Shows An Anti-Abortion Picketer Offering A Woman Help With Immigration If She "Keeps The Baby"

"I learnt that one of the things they do is specifically target people of colour and migrant patients who are trying to access the clinic," the 24-year-old Chinese-Australian told BuzzFeed News. "[The patients] are told that if they keep their baby, they get free legal services and immigration help and, in some cases, free visas." So she decided to see if it was true.

This Woman Paid Thousands Of Dollars To Fly Interstate For An Abortion

Federal health minister Greg Hunt echoed Ferguson that day in an interview with Sky News when he repeated that services had been “restored” in the state: “I can confirm that there are private services that will now be available.” But a week later Tasmanian woman and former government staffer Bianca* went to her GP where she returned a positive pregnancy blood test. Her story, in which she struggled to find anyone to do the procedure and ultimately spent more than $4,000 flying interstate, is proof that little has been done to address the situation.

Here's What The Woman Fired By Cricket Australia For Tweeting About Abortion Wants You To Know

Angela Williamson had no intention of telling her parents about her abortion. "I'm 39 and I had to tell my mum and dad that I'd lost my job because I tweeted about accessing abortion," Williamson, who was sacked by Cricket Australia in late June for tweeting about the lack of abortion access in her state, told BuzzFeed News. "So then of course I had to explain to [my parents] about my own termination." Williamson flew to Victoria in February for the procedure which cost $4,500 for flights, acc

The Australian Government Argued A Refugee Couldn’t Come To Australia For An Abortion Because Of The Size Of Her Vaginal Opening

Peter Dutton’s lawyers argued a pregnant refugee on Nauru with “extreme” genital mutilation who wanted an abortion didn’t need to be brought to Australia for the procedure. The lawyers said that because the woman's vagina had been unstitched, she should instead have the operation in Taiwan, without specialist care or the aid of an interpreter.
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