Women's health stories

We Might Be Getting A National Abortion Hotline. This State Is Successfully Running Its Own

A woman with an unwanted pregnancy to a violent partner, who doesn’t have enough money to pay a private provider for a surgical abortion; a woman whose period is two weeks late; a woman who is over 12 weeks gestation with an unwanted pregnancy in a rural area who had to travel to Melbourne for an abortion; a single mother with mental health concerns and an unintended pregnancy at an early gestation; a woman looking for a doctor to insert a hormonal contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD).

This Is How Women's Health Could Be Affected By The Election

The biggest chunk of money in the government’s women’s health strategy released this month was $20 million for research into ovarian cancer which prioritises early detection and finding a cure. The government has promised $32.6 million to make breast cancer scans more affordable, saving patients up to $1,500 per scan. It has promised $47 million in Medicare subsidies for breast cancer MRIs, a $20 million investment in the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute for research into advanced br

Here’s What You Need To Know About Endometriosis And Fertility

More than 700,000 Australian women have endometriosis, in which cells similar to those that line the uterus grow outside of the uterus, leading to all sorts of symptoms including debilitating pain. Up to a quarter of women with endometriosis are asymptomatic, but most experience dysmenorrhea (painful periods), chronic pelvic pain and painful sexual intercourse, and between 30% and 50% of endometriosis patients struggle with infertility. Endometriosis and infertility “go hand in hand” says Melbou

A Contraception Method Endorsed By The Church Is Getting Reproductive Health Funding

Unlike Labor's $9.5 million sexual and reproductive health strategy announced last month, which promises cheaper and better access to long-acting reversible contraception and abortion, Hunt has announced cash for four Victoria-based organisations that mostly help couples conceive. "More than $4 million over four years will go to four family planning organisations: Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority (VARTA), the Ovulation Method Research and Reference Centre of Australia (Bill

The Partner Of A Pregnant Woman Who Died After Leaving Hospital With Only Paracetamol Says She Was “Begging For Help”

"I was the loving partner of Naomi Williams," Michael Lampe began his statement on the final day of the coronial inquest into his partner's death. "I had no idea anything like this would ever happen to me and I had no idea I would ever be sitting here in this courtroom today. It just doesn’t seem real. It’s just three years ago I was celebrating Christmas in 2015 with Naomi. Life was almost perfect."

If An Aboriginal Woman Had Been From Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs, She Might Have Been Treated Better, Coroner Says

The New South Wales deputy state coroner said "as a middle class woman in the Eastern suburbs" of Sydney she herself would have been referred to a specialist had she presented to a hospital as frequently as a pregnant Indigenous woman did in 2015, before the woman died of sepsis. “Naomi Williams went to a doctor many many times and never got a specialist referral," coroner Harriet Grahame said on Thursday at the inquest into the Wiradjuri woman's death.

A Pregnant Woman Who Died Soon After Spending Half An Hour At A Hospital Should Have Been Seen By A Doctor, An Inquest Has Heard

Naomi Williams should have been seen by a doctor and asked to rate her pain when she turned up an emergency department in the Australian country town of Tumut, a coronial inquest into her death has heard. The pregnant Wiradjuri woman arrived at the hospital alone just after the new year had ticked by at midnight in 2016, where according to records, she stayed for 34 minutes, was given some Panadol, and then went home. Fifteen hours later while en route back to the hospital, the 27-year-old and

These Doctors Have The Facts On IUD Side Effects So Please Don’t Remove It Yourself

In a random 24-hour period this week dozens of women have described their nausea, breast tenderness, anxiety, hurting joints, fatigue, inability to exercise, sore neck, weight gain, depression, infertility, mood swings, bleeding and psoriasis which they are convinced is the fault of their hormonal intrauterine devices (IUD). This is not an unusual level of activity in the many private Facebook groups where thousands of Australian women gather every day to share stories and advice about their IUD

This Mother Of A Stillborn Baby Doesn't Want Any Other Women To Go Through What She Did

Ann-Maree Imrie conceived quickly and was told she had a healthy pregnancy. But at six-and-a-half months gestation, the Sydney mother noticed a change of movement and went in for a check-up. "The sonographer just looked at us and said 'I'm not able to find a foetal heartbeat'," Sydney mother Imrie told BuzzFeed News. "Obviously your world comes crashing down and then you're told to pick a day where they can induce you and you can give birth."

These Women Are Paying Tens Of Thousands Of Dollars To Have Children And Say It Should Be Refunded By Medicare

“I was able to continue the pregnancy and we delivered my son early at 33 weeks,” Richardson told BuzzFeed News. She then had a radical hysterectomy, in which the surgeon removed her uterus and the ligaments that hold it in place. “I still had my ovaries but at that time surrogacy was illegal in Queensland and I had reconciled only having one child,” she said. “The surrogacy legislation came in in 2010 and I was single, but I fell in love in 2015 and my husband Dion didn’t have children.” R

We Asked Doctors Every Question This Queer Couple Has About Getting Pregnant

“I love this concept that babies can accidentally happen,” Georgia tells BuzzFeed News. The 33-year-old Sydney woman wants to start a family with her partner Max, a 31-year-old trans guy. The couple, both using pseudonyms to protect their privacy, want to conceive over the next few years but have found very little information online to help them in their decision-making process. “At the moment it is a pretty intense process and having healthcare professionals that you trust is important.”

Reporting the facts on abortion

Women Seeking Abortions Are Being Turned Away From Queensland’s Hospitals. This July 2016 article was BuzzFeed News’ foray into reproductive rights coverage in Australia. We have since published 109 stories in which we’ve spoken to patients, lawmakers, politicians, activists and doctors about access to abortion in Australia. It is estimated that half of all pregnancies in Australia are unplanned and that half of those are terminated, but those figures are almost 30 years old. We quickly found that this lack of current data, as well as the fact that access differs across states and territories, became an obstacle in every aspect of reporting on this issue.

The Stories Of Women Who Have Had Mesh Implants Are Heartbreaking

"This is, I believe, one of the greatest medical scandals and abuses of mothers in Australia's history," senator Derryn Hinch said before an ongoing Senate inquiry into transvaginal mesh implants. Urogynaecological meshes, sometimes known as transvaginal meshes, are inserted into women as a treatment option for pelvic organ prolapse (when the connective tissue securing the vagina and uterus to the pelvis gives way after childbirth), or urinary incontinence.

Everything You Need To Know About The Contraceptives Creating Controversy In Australia At The Moment

Australian gynaecologists and obstetricians have this week defended long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCS) after some users described severe side-effects they had suffered. Patients told the ABC they had experienced anxiety, chronic pelvic pain, non-stop bleeding and scarring after removals. A subsequent Fairfax Media article detailed the experiences of more women who described acne, hair loss and mental health issues.
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